Table 3 from 2003 updated with 2017 report

Table 3. Rankings of State Life Expectancy at Birth for White Males: 1960 to 1990 State* Year 1960 1970 1980 1990. Source

https://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0049/tab03.pdf

National Vital Statistics Report’s  Volume 66, number 6, November 27,   Final Data for 2015

https://www.cdc.Gov/nchs/data/Nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_06.pdf

*Alaska and Hawaii are excluded from the rankings since life expectancy [from 1960 to 1990] was not calculated in 1970 for these two states. Sources: National Center for Health Statistics, 1975. Some Trends and Comparisons of United States Life-Table Data: 1900-1971. National Center for Health Statistics, 1985-86. State Life Tables, Alabama-Wyoming, U.S. Decennial Life Tables for 1979-81. National Center for Health Statistics, 1998. U.S. Decennial Life Tables for 1989-91, State Life Tables.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Internet Release date: September 26, 2003

Take a look at the table, which is a list of 50 states and the District of Columbia compiled and ranked according to life tables. Beginning in 1960, the states were ranked 1 to 48, leaving out Alaska and Hawaii. 1st is best. 48th is not a nomination for an award. Then as each census came along, states were reranked, some higher, some unchanged, some lower. But the 2000 census and 2010 census were not ranked when expected. Instead a report came out in 2017 relying on 2015 estimates, instead of an exact head count as was in the 2010 census. When the metrics and statistics were cranked out, and reported after the 2016 election, the Red states did poorly, and Blue states very well.

Trump states in Red, Clinton states in Blue November 2016 election, US Map.

The 30 RED States, after the 2016 election, had a collapse of  154 place rankings for the life table, while the BLUE states, after the same election, rose 155 places, a net swing of over 300 places.  More is available at this column in the UtahStandardNews.

In the 54 years from 1960 to 2014, over 2 generations, Red Utah had never been ranked below 44 of the states. For the top eleven rankings in 2017,  Utah had  ranked below Minnesota  (2) twice (1960, 1980), never below Hawaii (1, unranked until 2017), California (3), Connecticut (4) , Massachusetts (5), New York (6), Vermont (7), Colorado (8), New Hampshire (9),  New Jersey (10), and Washington (11).

In over  5 decades Red North Dakota ranked below Minnesota (2) once (1990),  and never below Hawaii (1, unranked until 2017), California (3), Connecticut (4) , Massachusetts (5), New York (6), Vermont (7), Colorado (8), New Hampshire (9),  New Jersey (10), and Washington (11).

In over  5 decades  Red Kansas ranked below Minnesota 3 times (1970, 1980, 1990), and never below Hawaii (1, unranked until 2017), California (3), Massachusetts (5), New York (6), Vermont (7), once below Colorado (8) in 1990, never below New Hampshire (9),  New Jersey (10), and twice below Washington (11) in 1980 and 1990.

In over  5 decades Red Iowa never ranked below Hawaii (1, unranked until 2017), California (3), Massachusetts (5), New York (6), Vermont (7), Colorado (8),  New Hampshire (9),  New Jersey (10), or Washington (11).

In over  5 decades Red Wisconsin never ranked below Hawaii (1, unranked until 2017), California (3), Massachusetts (5), New York (6), Vermont (7), Colorado (8),  New Hampshire (9),  New Jersey (10), or Washington (11).

In over  5 decades Red South Dakota never ranked below Hawaii (1, unranked until 2017), California (3), Massachusetts (5), New York (6), Vermont (7), Colorado (8),  New Hampshire (9),  New Jersey (10), or Washington (11).

In over  5 decades  Red Idaho never ranked below Hawaii (1, unranked until 2017), California (3), Massachusetts (5), New York (6), Vermont (7), below Colorado (8) twice 1970 & 1980,  never below New Hampshire (9),  below New Jersey (10) once in 1970,  and below Washington (11) twice  1980 & 1990.

In over  5 decades Ten Red states, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Utah, Wisconsin, South Dakota, Idaho, Florida, Michigan,   never ranked below  Blue New York  (6) until 2017.

In over  5 decades Nine Red states, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Utah, Wisconsin, South Dakota, Idaho, and Michigan,   never ranked below Blue California  (3) until 2017.

In over  5 decades Eight  Red states, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Utah, Wisconsin, South Dakota, Idaho,   never ranked below Blue Vermont  (7) until 2017.

In over  5 decades  ten Red states, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Utah, Wisconsin, South Dakota, Idaho, Florida, Michigan,   never ranked below  Blue New Hampshire  (9) until 2017.

In over  5 decades  seven Red states, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Utah, Wisconsin, South Dakota, never ranked below Blue  New Jersey  (10) until 2017.

In over  5 decades Eight  Red states, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Utah, Wisconsin, South Dakota, never ranked below Blue Washington (11) until 2017.

Many economists acknowledge that death statistics are a metric of economic activity, to wit wealthy live longer, poor not so much. Life expectancy is a reflection of government leadership, to wit better leaders, better health, longer lives. Better preparedness, better health. More supplies, more health professionals, more hospital beds, better treatment and more survivors. Thus longer life expectancy.

More medical schools, more doctors, more treatments, more survivors. Many more medical schools, many more doctors, many more treated, many more survivors. Fewer schools, fewer doctors, rationing of health care, less attention to care. Fewer vaccines, fewer immunized, more risk. More vaccines, more immunized, less risk.

Notice that health insurance is not a metric of death statistics. More insurance does not increase medical school seats, and hence does not increase doctors. More insurance does not discover more vaccines, nor manufacturer more vaccines. Insurance does not set broken bones, deliver babies, or diagnose infections. Insurance is a form of rationing limited supplies, and limited services, and limited beds.

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Yale Alumni Magazine May 2020. Hospital beds in the gym. Libraries closed. Classes online. Facing down Covid-19.

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